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Many people would consider 700 to be a good credit score, though in reality, it’s below the US average FICO score of 711. If your score is in the 600s or below, you’d probably love to get it up to 700

Would you like to know how to get a 700 credit score in 90 days?   

Depending on your credit history, it is quite possible you can improve your credit score by 100 to 150 points in 90 days. This won’t work for everyone. If you’re just out of bankruptcy and your score is 450 it will take a lot longer. For many people, it’s still a reasonable goal.

Your ability to change your credit score fast will depend heavily on what’s already in your credit file.

If you have a thin credit file with a short history and only a few records, a few new moves can change your score dramatically.

If you have a lot of information in your file it will be harder to move your score.

Ways to Boost Your Credit Fast

To build credit, you have to use credit responsibly. That’s hard to do if you can’t get credit, but there are credit products that are designed to help you build credit.

If you want a quick bump to your credit score, try these moves.

Use a Credit-Builder Loan

A credit builder loan is an installment loan product designed specifically to help you build your credit. It does this by reversing the usual loan process. Instead of getting the money upfront and paying the installments back, you pay the installments first and then get the money.

This system almost eliminates the risk of default, so lenders are willing to offer these loans to borrowers with no credit or bad credit. Many credit-builder loans offer very low monthly payments, which makes it easy to keep up and make payments on time.

Many local banks and credit unions offer credit-builder loans, or you can look to nationwide lenders like Self or Credit Strong.

A credit-builder loan will be particularly effective if you don’t already have an active installment loan on your credit record. Remember that a credit-builder loan will only help your credit if you make every payment on time.

Try a Secured Credit Card

Part of your credit score is your credit mix: lenders like to see that you can handle both installment loans, like a student loan or a credit builder loan, and revolving credit, like a credit card. Of course it’s hard to get a credit card if you don’t have good credit.

A secured credit card can get you past this hurdle. You put down a deposit, and the deposit becomes your credit limit. That reduces the risk to the issuer, so they can issue these cards to borrowers with poor credit or no credit.

A secured card will only help your credit if you use your card wisely. Keep your balance below 30% of your credit limit, much lower if you can. Pay off every balance in full on or before the due date.

Here’s a proven way to build credit with a card. Put one recurring expense that you’d pay anyway on the card, like a Netflix subscription or your internet bill. Set up a pull payment from your checking account and make sure there’s enough money there to pay it. Then put the card away.

The card will be active, the balance will be small, and the card will be paid on time. That’s a recipe for boosting your credit.

Store Cards Can Help

There are several store-specific cards that are available to people with low credit. These products are designed to help you build credit.

Remember that these card issuers aren’t generous: they also want to make money. They typically do this by charging high prices for the goods they sell.

If you’re aware of this, you can use these cards effectively. Be sure that you buy only inexpensive products and only buy items you really need. You’ll pay a premium, but the boost to your credit score may be worth it.

Check out cards from Fingerhut and Kikoff.

Look After the Credit You Have

Adding new tradelines to your credit report can boost your credit, especially if you are new to the credit game. If you already have loans or credit cards, you’ll also have to manage them effectively. Here’s what you need to do.

  • Make every payment on time. Payment history is the most important part of your credit score.
  • Keep your credit utilization low. Keep card balances below 30% of your credit limit.
  • Don’t close old accounts. If you’re not using an old card just leave it open, unless it has a large fee. It will help the length of your credit history.
  • Pay off credit card balances. You’ll pay less interest and lower your credit utilization.
  • Ask your card issuer to increase your limit. A higher credit limit can lower your credit utilization instantly.
  • Use the authorized user strategy. If a friend or family member adds you to their card as an authorized user, your credit score can gain.
  • Put your bill payments to work. You can place your bill payments on your credit report for free with services like eCredable Lift and Experian Boost.
  • Use a rent reporting company. Rent reporting companies can put up to 2 years of rent payments on your credit report. You’ll pay for this service, so you’ll have to decide if it’s worth it

Best Secured Credit Cards in 2021

Compare multiple secured credit cards at one time, pick the best option, and get approved fast.

Compare Cards

Take Action!  

You will see your score gains as soon as your creditors report to the credit bureaus. That’s often within the first 30-60 days of starting to use these tools.

Want a free credit score? Check out our definitive guide on getting a free credit score

These steps can help you build your credit and get on a path toward financial freedom.

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements, or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.